Yellow cedar decline mapping in Kake - completed for this year

After some exciting small plane flights through southeast Alaska in winter, we've completed the initial fieldwork for the yellow cedar decline/mortality + harvest study.  The stands were completely mapped, seedling to snag, with attention paid to microsites, understory species, and others.  The purpose of this is 1) to understand how forests change with this species-specific disturbance process and 2) provide a baseline to compare the multiple disturbance scenario (decline + harvest) after the harvest, currently anticipated next year.  We'll be able to look at successional trajectory change, impacts to soils and species, and overall harvest intensity.  

We're also planting post-harvest with western redcedar (Thuja plicata), a semi-distant relative that has some real interesting similarities both ecologically and chemically to yellow cedar.  As a prelude, we also mapped a naturally occurring stand near Kake - the northernmost stand of western redcedar - where it appears to be taking over rapidly post-yellow cedar decline (natural).  There's been intensive bark harvesting in that area too - a really neat site ecologically and culturally.

 

The map doesn't look like much now, but it's packed with associated data.  Each tree is represented by a circle (live) or square (dead).  The scale bar is 10m, for a total plot size of 20x20m.  Seedlings are hardly visible, but there - size is proportional to DBH.  We have a bunch of these plots now, and many of the yellow cedar (live and dead) are scheduled to be harvested.  How will those disturbances interact?  What will it mean for the remaining species and overall successional trajectory?

The map doesn't look like much now, but it's packed with associated data.  Each tree is represented by a circle (live) or square (dead).  The scale bar is 10m, for a total plot size of 20x20m.  Seedlings are hardly visible, but there - size is proportional to DBH.  We have a bunch of these plots now, and many of the yellow cedar (live and dead) are scheduled to be harvested.  How will those disturbances interact?  What will it mean for the remaining species and overall successional trajectory?