Field plots at ~3200 meters / 10,000 feet

Field work

Intensive, on the ground measurements underlay the majority of our work.  Long-term plot measurements, quick surveys, and intensive soil/tree sampling are required to build solid datasets - and we do them.  Many of these are long-term plots, where trees are tagged for repeat measurements.  Nothing beats getting data the old fashioned way.

Laboratory Analyses

Examination of the biochemical impacts of disturbances and management actions - like soil nitrogen - requires specialized instrumentation.  We use a suite of systems to explore the intricate and important relationship between forests, disturbances, and chemistry.

Statistical Modeling

Perhaps the biggest and most intriguing challenge is the use of "big data" and broad data sets.  There is an immense amount of information available on forest change at broad scales, and it takes specific and focused techniques to make sense of it.  But it's an amazing opportunity - at no time in history have we had such a broad view of change, and the ability to synthesize it.  Our work which spans the North Pacific coastal forests, our continental scale disturbance pattern, and the focus on water across the lower 48 are examples of this type of work.

Remote Sensing

The perspective and scaling potential you get from satellites is amazing.  Using new methods and algorithms, we explore the consequences of disturbance and management over very large scales - from states to continents.  For example, we are linking forest disturbances to changes in streamflow at the national level via 30m resolution imagery - quite a task, and only possible with satellites.

LiDAR is also useful for carbon estimation at relatively large scales.  This map (the Heen Latinee experimental forest) was completed as part of NASA funded project linking stream and forest carbon fluxes.  Buma et al. in press.

GLORIA  (http://www.gloria.ac.at/) site installed summer, 2017.  This site will allow for coordinated, global investigations into climate change in coastal forests.  The plots are meticulously laid out - these strings run from the central point (in this case, a summit by Cairn Peak) on specific cardinal bearings and for very specific distances - a standardized method used around the world.

GLORIA  (http://www.gloria.ac.at/) site installed summer, 2017.  This site will allow for coordinated, global investigations into climate change in coastal forests.  The plots are meticulously laid out - these strings run from the central point (in this case, a summit by Cairn Peak) on specific cardinal bearings and for very specific distances - a standardized method used around the world.